Make up Your Makeup; Let’s continue collecting

bcm300

Make up Your Makeup is more than just about becoming the best makeup artist. Growing and building your makeup collection is one of the most exciting things when you start out in makeup. You test products, you hate products, you find your holy grails and through the hauls and all the trials and errors, you fall in love with the process of makeup and building your collection. As you test new products, you build and collect your makeup collection and so the idea to gamify a process this simple, intrigued me into developing Make up Your Makeup.

The game’s world, is to be set in a makeup artist’s kit or the makeup artists collection. Its intention is to feel as though you are creating your makeup kit and picking up products (the cards) to build your kit. This is represented through the design of the gameboards.

The player gameboards are designed in sections and are categorised by the type of products and what they may be used for, e.g. cheeks have blush, bronzer and highlighter.

Make up Your Makeup, although initially ideated as a board game has now been converted to focus on being played as a card game. I wanted to make the game simplistic in its core game loops and mechanics, all the whilst keeping the true fundamentals of building your makeup collection.

Makeup collectors collect, trade or dispose of their products and so those mechanics needed to be implemented into the game. The game loop is as simple as playing with the 2 card decks (makeup & clientele cards). With each game round, the player will pick a makeup card, and decide if they will play their card in their gameboard, trade with other players or dispose of the card on the centre gameboard. Once the row has been completed, the player may collect their clientele card.

My 3-act structure is mentioned in my video from 1:15 – 1:53.

I feel that my game is best suited to be part of a family genre. Its aesthetics need to appeal to a younger audience but also have the appeal to those older, therefore I have placed a heavy emphasis on the game aesthetics and colour. The world of makeup is bright and colourful and this was important for me to show in the game through the game boards and the cards.

My game in the long run I hope would be picked up and sold at Mecca or Sephora (or even both) as they sell different brands. This real-life version of the game would have benefits for those who register to play and begin collecting and trading their products with one another, and with the end prize having the potential to work in partnership with one of these beauty brands. This could be online through their apps or focus on being an in-store hunt to locate particular items.

Upon researching makeup themed games, I discovered a Sephora themed monopoly game and a game named PrettyPro (Boardgamegeek, 2022). PrettyPro is a pen and paper game with the intention to move around the board game to collect the pieces it requires, to give other players their makeovers.Players must collect makeup to be able to complete a makeup look on their opponent.

I see my card game being most comparable to bingo in the sense of collecting and matching my cards up to the game boards players are using, which Bingo does through the matching up of numbers to be able to gain the 5 in a row. I would also compare my game to games such as PrettyPro. I believe my game is a blend of these 2 games’ mechanics and loops.

Make Up Your Makeup is an innovative card game because of the difference it holds against other makeup themed games. The majority of the makeup themed games out on the market are based on the idea of creating a makeup look with the products provided to another player’s face / your own or to a mannequin head. This is a mechanic that my game does not use but has the ability to show players what is needed for a simple makeup look.

As seen in my video, I had developed a prototype game that allowed me to test out my game rules and my how to play instructions (seen below).

Original Game Rules & How to play

This initial playtesting stage showed me what was missing. The game was too short. It needed an element of excitement or a way to make it harder for the winner to be determined. The first way to improve the game was through the introduction of points. Each card is worth a particular number of points making it a little more exciting through the element of chance and surprise when collecting your new card in each round. To be able to gain a clientele card, the products need to have been correctly allocated on the gameboard and also have the same number value on each of the cards in the row. This means trading and disposing of cards needs to be done wisely.

This new point system was playtested in class and I was provided with feedback (seen below) that assisted in my 3rd round of adjustments. My apologies for the messy handwriting.

New Game Rules & How to Play

With the feedback I received during the playtest in class, I made revisions to my gameboards, cards and tried to better explain the game in a manner that was clearer for players to understand.

Having made a 3rd round of revisions, I hope to get even more feedback on a way to improve my game because I have thoroughly enjoyed the process of creating Make up Your Makeup.

References

PrettyPro Game 2022, BoardGameGeek, viewed 9 May 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/223758/prettypro-game&gt;.

Video References

History – The Playing Card Factory 2015, The Playing Card Factory, viewed 18 April 2022, <https://theplayingcardfactory.com/history&gt;.

Playing cards – National decks | Britannica 2022, Encyclopædia Britannica, viewed 18 April 2022, <https://www.britannica.com/topic/playing-card/National-decks>.

Introducing Make up Your Makeup!

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My passion has always been makeup and so Make up your Makeup was born.

My intention behind the game was to ideate and develop a game that focused on building a pro makeup artist kit with a play and trade style of game. By collecting the makeup cards /trading the cards, not only are players learning what products can be found in a pro makeup artist kit and are building their kit, but they’re also getting to enjoy a makeup themed game, something that through browsing boardgamegeek, I discovered appears does not exist. It looks like I’ve discovered a niche with the potential for a game release.

Makeup Games

Having no makeup themed tabletop games already on the market, it is difficult for me to determine how well this game would perform if released to the public. What can be commonly found online when you search “makeup games” are the games where makeup is applied to either a mannequin head/another player or to paper to design a look.

In Australia, the cosmetics industry is worth $3.73 billion and is only expected to continue to grow (Australia Beauty and Personal Care Products Market – Growth, Trends, and Forecasts (2022 – 2027) 2022), with this said, I believe my game has the potential once finalised to fit within this industry and open a new niche to other aspiring game developers. Partnerships with big named beauty brands could accelerate the growth of this niche and become a form of advertising that could generate sales to both the brand and my game.

Below are my game rules and a basic game prototype which includes what the player’s boards would look like as well as the cards that would be played with.

I wanted to Make up Your Makeup to feature a soft and girly aesthetic to attract a younger audience. The aesthetics of my game would be crucial to its success and so I have placed a heavy emphasis on pretty colours and recognisable fonts and symbols.

The game loop is as simple as playing with the 2 card decks (makeup & clientele cards).

With each game round, the player will pick a makeup card, then decide if they will play their card in their gameboard, trade with other players or dispose of the card to the centre gameboard which you can see in action in my prototype video.

Once a row has been completed, a player may collect a clientele card.

As Makeup your Makeup is still in its early prototype stage, I hope to receive feedback to implement into the game design to improve the experience, and game mechanics/ game loops. I hope to receive feedback on a strategy to implement points to elongate the game experience as well as a way to make the game have a more competitive feel.

References

Australia Beauty and Personal Care Products Market – Growth, Trends, and Forecasts (2022 – 2027) 2022, Mordorintelligence.com, viewed 20 April 2022, <https://www.mordorintelligence.com/industry-reports/australia-beauty-and-personal-care-products-market-industry#:~:text=Market%20Overview,period%20(2021%2D2026).>.

BoardGameGeek | Gaming Unplugged Since 2000 2022, Boardgamegeek.com, viewed 24 April 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/geeksearch.php?action=search&objecttype=boardgame&q=makeup%20games&gt;.

MY GAMEPLAY EXPERIENCE- FROM A NON-GAMING, MAKEUP-LOVING GIRLY-GIRL!

bcm300

In BCM300 I have played 3 games so far. In the video below, I give my autoethnographic experience on the 3 games whilst the blog post that continues will delve into the games themselves.

6 Nimmt

6 Nimmt is a 2-10 player card game designed by Wolfgang Kramer. It was released in 1994 and has 36 different publishers (the list is featured below). There are 4 total game variations that can be played depending on the number of total players, so instead of using the full deck of 104 cards, you can play with 24, 44 or 54 cards. 5 different artists illustrated the game, Timur Baskakov, Design Edge, Bill Herrin, Gatis Sluka and Franz Vohwinkel. Their aim was to reach their target audience of kids and families as this is classed as a family game.

The games’ theme and setting intrigues me. Although its theme is based on the bulls and striving to not collect or to collect the bulls and their points, at times I feel that the game’s theme and setting feel odd. Why bulls? It has no exact backstory but this makes it enjoyable as you don’t need to think about the backstory and can just enjoy the game and the experience it brings.

Dobble

Dobble is also known as Spot it or any of its other 93 different names/versions. Dobble is another card game for 2-8 players. This is categorised as a kids game with the illustrations heavily focused on cartoon characters, bubbly, bright font and vivid colours. Released in 2009, it continues to create new variations. The game has 4 designers who also illustrated the game, Denis Blanchot, Jacques Cottereau, Guilliaume Gille-Naves and Igor Polouchine. Depending on the country and variation of the game and therefore there are a few different publishers (list below).

It features funny looking characters which were what drew my attention. It is similar to 6 Nimmt in terms that the game doesn’t have a backstory that’s required to be learnt which make the game more enjoyable. It focuses on speed as a theme something which if you like competitive games, I would highly recommend playing with a large group.

City Line

City Line is a pen, paper and dice game with the aim of building and occupying a city. The game has 3 phases, the construction phase that allows you to build your buildings, the time phase, where you determine the time of day and the occupancy phase, where you grow your population. The game is categorised as a dice game targeted at families. The game is designed by Jason Tagmire and published by Button Shy Games in 2020. The game is simple with it requiring your game card, a pen and 6 dice. There is no credited illustrator or artist for this game.

If you would like to access any of the mentioned games, I’ve provided links to Board Game arena as well as a way to download City Line.

References

Bill Herrin | Board Game Artist | BoardGameGeek 2022, Boardgamegeek.com, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameartist/35690/bill-herrin&gt;.

Cityline 2020, PNPArcade, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://www.pnparcade.com/products/cityline&gt;.

Cityline 2022, BoardGameGeek, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/308598/cityline/credits&gt;.

Design Edge | Board Game Artist | BoardGameGeek 2022, Boardgamegeek.com, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameartist/44835/design-edge&gt;.

Franz Vohwinkel | Board Game Artist | BoardGameGeek 2022, Boardgamegeek.com, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameartist/11883/franz-vohwinkel&gt;.

Gatis Sluka | Board Game Artist | BoardGameGeek 2022, Boardgamegeek.com, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameartist/65231/gatis-sluka&gt;.

Spot it! 2022, BoardGameGeek, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/63268/spot-it/credits&gt;.

6 nimmt! 2020, BoardGameGeek, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/432/6-nimmt/credits&gt;.

Timur Baskakov | Board Game Artist | BoardGameGeek 2022, Boardgamegeek.com, viewed 23 March 2022, <https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameartist/102034/timur-baskakov&gt;.